Author Archives: Lisa C.

Senate Bill could save lives in Lake City

This press release popped up in my email last week, and I became curious about the potential benefits for Lake City pedestrian access.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE — April 17, 2013
Senate passes Safe Streets bill

OLYMPIA — A bill to improve safety on Washington streets passed the Washington State Senate by a 45-2 vote today.

HB 1045 would cut the red tape for cities seeking to lower speed limits on neighborhood streets, saving money – and, more importantly, lives.

“All of the research is clear – a pedestrian’s chance of surviving an accident increases greatly as the speed of the car decreases,” said Sen. David Frockt, D-Seattle. “Communities should be able to stand up and say that they want safer streets for their kids and their families.”

Frockt was a co-sponsor of the companion bill to HB 1045 in the Senate. HB 1045 passed the House on a bipartisan 86-10 vote.

The bill would not directly change any speed limits but would allow cities and towns to lower speed limits on side streets – not major commercial streets or highways – without the need for costly engineering studies. Right now, cities and counties must pay for an engineering report to raise or lower a speed limit. An engineering report would still be required to raise a speed limit, to ensure that the road could handle the higher speed. Since a road can always handle a lower speed, the engineering report would no longer be necessary to lower a speed limit. The reduction in red tape and expenses for local governments would improve local control over speed limits and increase governmental efficiency.

Studies show that a person struck by a car going 30 miles per hour has a 40 percent chance of dying. When the speed of the car drops to 20 mph, the pedestrian’s likelihood of dying drops to just 5 percent.

“This bill will save money and save lives,” said Frockt. “Safe and walkable streets are important for a livable neighborhood. With the passage of this bill, cities and towns across the state will have more flexibility to help keep people safe.”

# # #

For interviews: Sen. David Frockt, 360-786-7690
For more information: Alex Bond, 360-786-7853
Website: www.senatedemocrats.wa.gov/senators/frockt

A quick email check-in with Lake City Greenways, “Greenways are designed to calm auto traffic to 20 mph, and being able to post that speed on GWs in addition to trying to engineer it would be great.  Also a street like 32nd in Little Brook which is not suitable for a greenway (too much volume, many disabled) might benefit by posting a 20 mph limit.”

Thank you Senator Frockt for supporting this bill!

A neighbor approaches 31st Ave NE and NE 130th on his way to Fred Meyers. He uses his walker in the street because this sidewalk is impassable. One block away on his left is Lake City Way, where cars speed past through and around this corner on their way to the arterial of 30th Ave NE - a common bypass for those wishing to avoid 522 in morning and evening traffic.

An elderly neighbor approaches 31st Ave NE and NE 130th on his way to Fred Meyers. He uses his walker in the street because this sidewalk is impassable. One block away on his left is Lake City Way, where cars speed through and around this corner on their way to the arterial of 30th Ave NE – a common bypass for those wishing to avoid 522 in morning and evening traffic.

– Lisa Chan is a consummate pedestrian and Lake City resident, who is looking forward to and working towards cleaner and safer walking routes in around our area.

 

LCNA introduces Coffee Talks Series in cooperation with the APA

Come hear from and ask the experts about how we can come together to revitalize our area!

The Lake City Neighborhood Alliance (LCNA) in partnership with the Washington Chapter of the American Planning Association (APA) will be hosting a series of lectures concerning future re-visioning and development in Lake City.

From the flyer to be released by the LCNA,

The Washington Chapter of the American Planning Association’s Community Planning Assistance Team (CPAT) is co-hosting a series of “Coffee Talks” for the Lake City community with the Lake City Neighborhood Alliance.  These Coffee Talks are a series of community learning opportunities to help educate our community on planning elements that will impact the success of planning for our neighborhood’s growth and development.  The intent of these Coffee Talks are to learn about key concepts that could help guide our work on the Pierre Property redevelopment and with City agencies on meeting our broader neighborhood plan goals.

Coffee Talk #1 will be held Tuesday March 26th, 2013 at the Lake City Community Center in Room 8. The focus will be Economic Development, featuring speakers Greg Easton and Kay Knapton and followed by discussion with community members.

Greg Easton is the founding principal in Property Counselors, and has over 30 years experience in providing economic consulting services.

Kay Knapton specializes in economic development and small business assistance.

 

 

 

Cleanup Walks in Lake City

Bottles, cans, and a baggie collected on a leisurely walk.

Bottles, cans, and a baggie collected on a leisurely walk in Lisa’s neighborhood.

While networking with other Lake City residents recently, I’ve been hearing interest in neighborhood walks and cleanup. The majority of our harsh weather may be over, and that means more pedestrian activity!

Walks are surprisingly easy to start, and not a lot of work to maintain. Benefits include meeting your neighbors, discovering issues, getting to know the wildlife and seasonal changes, and safer walkways.

The Lake City Neighborhood Alliance has a page up detailing how to find or get one started in your area. At the moment, I believe more walks exist than are on the calendar and I’m hoping more will show up as interest grows. Supplies for protection and collection can be acquired from the Lake City Neighborhood Service Center.

I’ve been enjoying group and solo walks in my neighborhood since September of last year. In that time, I’ve rescued 3 loose dogs (and returned them), picked up countless needles out of grass areas where school buses drop off children, met quite a few of my neighbors, and gained a better understanding of vandalism and trash in our area. I’ve also occasionally joined Douglas Park Cooperative (DPC) on their walks and learned much about Lake City’s Hub Urban Village issues. Here’s a dated example of a DPC walk report. And here’s one of mine.

Interested in beautifying your little corner of Lake City? Don’t hesitate! I’m learning to love it and all the benefits (fitness, and a nicer environment overall). You don’t have to wait on neighborhood interest before starting. Bring a bag with you on your next walk and be open to conversation with curious neighbors. You may just discover a fitness buddy! I met my dog walking companions this way.