Category Archives: Home & Garden

A Parent’s Guide to Foot Health for Athletic Kids

baseballMillions of American children will participate in warm weather sports this year, from softball to soccer and swimming to cycling. No matter what their sport or whether they play competitively or just for fun, they will have one important thing in common: They’ll need their feet to be pain-free if they’re going to play their best and prevent injuries.

“Sports play a significant role in the lives of millions of young athletes,” says Rion Berg DPM, a podiatrist at the Foot and Ankle Center of Lake City and member of the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA). “Parents need to be aware that sports, which require a substantial amount of running, turning, and contact, can translate to injuries. Protecting children’s feet from injuries, and bringing them to a podiatrist when problems occur, can help keep kids in the game and make the sport more enjoyable.”

APMA offers some tips for helping protect children’s feet while playing warm-weather sports:

  • Protective taping of the ankles is often necessary to help prevent sprains or fractures.
  • Buying a shoe designed for the specific sport your child plays not only improves your child’s performance in the sport, but it also can help protect him or her from serious foot and ankle injuries. APMA has given its Seal of Acceptance to select sports footwear, which offer quality materials and protective support.
  • Without the right sock, even the best athletic shoe won’t score points—on the field or off. Athletic socks should consist of a natural/synthetic blend, which is best at wicking away moisture and minimizing foot odor. Socks should not have large seams that might cause blisters or irritation. Commonly played warm-weather sports and the risks associated with them include:
  • Basketball – Children playing basketball may be at risk for ankle sprains, tendinitis, and plantar fasciitis (inflammation of the thick band of tissue on the sole of the foot). To minimize the risk of foot injury, choose a shoe with a thick, stiff sole, high ankle support, and shock absorption.
  • Tennis – The rapid, repetitive lateral movements and shifting of weight required of tennis players can lead to injuries such as ankle sprains, plantar fasciitis, and corns or calluses. Tennis players will do best with a flexible-soled shoe that supports both sides of the foot.
  • Running – Movements required of runners include leg extension and hitting the balls of the feet with a great deal of force. Running can lead to shin splints, heel pain, and blisters. A good running shoe should offer good support and shock absorption. In some cases, custom orthotics may be necessary to provide additional support and control of foot motion.
  • Soccer – The running, jumping, and lateral movements required of soccer players can lead to many foot injuries, with heel pain and shin splints being among the most common. Soccer shoes should provide multiple cleats in the heel area and enough room for thick soccer socks.

“Sports-related foot and ankle injuries are on the rise as more children participate actively in sports,” Dr. Berg says. “Parents need to be vigilant to ensure children’s feet remain healthy and safe. And remember—lack of complaint by a child is not a reliable sign that everything is fine. The bones of growing feet are so flexible that they can be twisted and distorted without the child being aware of it.”

Ensuring your child’s feet stay healthy could go a long way—your young athlete could one day be the next LeBron James or Brandi Chastain. If your child participates in strenuous sports, monitor his or her foot health closely. If you suspect a problem, take your child to a podiatrist for evaluation and treatment.

Rion Berg DPM is a podiatrist at Foot and Ankle Center of Lake in Seattle, WA.  Call 206-368-7000 or visit www.bergdpm.com to make an appointment. Visit www.apma.org to learn more about foot health and care.

 

‘Private property’ signs go up at formerly public beach on Lake Washington

"Private property" signs recently went up at a beach that for nearly 80 years was public.

“Private property” signs recently went up at a beach that for nearly 80 years was public.

“Private property” signs were recently staked into the ground of a piece of waterfront property that for nearly 80 years was used as public access to the water of Lake Washington. Marks on the ground show where a sign that was announcing improvements planned by the City of Seattle was dragged away.

Lake City Live has been following the controversy and the court’s ruling that gave ownership of the property at the end NE 130th Street to the adjacent property owners. You can see our coverage here and here.

Neighbors advocating to keep the land public have been organizing via a Facebook group. They are asking the City of Seattle to condemn the property so it can be returned to public use. And in a Wednesday report, KIRO/7 said that the effort seems to be gaining traction with City of Seattle leaders.

KIRO/7 visited the site on Wednesday and filed this report. In the video below they try to talk to one of the property owners without success.

Nathan Hale Urban Farm, first design meeting Dec. 14

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An urban farm is planned near Nathan Hale High School. And the first design meeting for the project is being held on December 14th. The public is welcome to attend.

Nathan Hale Urban Farm First Design Meeting

Sunday, December 14, 2014
9:00am-9:30am, tour at the Greenhouse, north of Jane Addams Middle School (11051 34th Avenue NE)

10:00am-2:00pm, Community Forum at Nathan Hale High School (10750 30th Avenue NE)

Lunch will be provided.

Please RSVP by clicking here.

Street trees cut down in front of Rick’s, replaced with much smaller trees

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Back in May we reported that DreamGirls at Rick’s trimmed back street trees in front of the business. At the time the pruning seemed severe. It prompted complaints from the community.

They were then required by City of Seattle arborists to replace the trees along Lake City Way that were pruned, because at the time it was thought the trees may not survive the pruning or were damaged. The city determined then that topping of the trees was illegal.

From a KIRO Radio report at the time:

The strip club will have to pay for the city to replace the five trees on SR 522 and restore the area to its former appearance. The city won’t say how much it will cost to remove the damaged trees and replace them with new trees of similar size. “The cost will be ‘substantial.”

But over the summer the previously pruned trees recovered and filled out with new branches and leaves, regaining some of their previous size. They survived just fine and looked healthy.

Now those trees that survived the shears, have been cut down. They have been replaced with much smaller trees. The new trees are shown above. The previously pruned trees below.

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