Plantar Fasciitis is Top Foot Problem in Lake City

kiddies parade 2015Lake City celebrated their annual SalmonFest this year in style. Over the Aug 7-9, 2015 weekend, we all got to enjoy a variety of music, arts and crafts booths, a vintage market, how to stay healthy booths, the Kiddies parade and of course the biggest draw–SALMON.

I just love how Lake City does this event and much of the thanks goes to Diane Haugen. Each year Diane puts all her energy into this big event along with her husband Don and many, many volunteers. A human dynamo she runs both the Lake City Community Center and the North Seattle Chamber of Commerce.

The Foot and Ankle Center of Lake City got to throw its hat in the ring this year as well. As part of the Wellness area we provided opportunities for people to learn how to test shoes before they buy them  and we also conducted a survey of the top foot problems in Lake City.

Not surprisingly plantar fasciitis or heel pain was the top foot problem. We see it every day in our office. It’s common in runners, those who wear unsupportive shoes, and those with wonky foot mechanics. In some cases it’s easy to treat with an over-the-counter insert such as Superfeet orPowerstep. However, it usually requires a multifaceted approach to get rid of the pain.

The second most common complaint was toenail fungus. Since this was a public arena we were surprised that people were willing to put a dot next to this condition since it’s often perceived as quite embarrassing. Beyond looking ugly, others think that toenail fungus is harmless. Unfortunately it’s not.  It can spread to others, can cause pain, and can increase the risk of ulcers in people with diabetes.

Call us today at 206-368-7000 for an appointment, often same day if you or a loved one is suffering from one of these conditions. You can also request an appointment online

Click here to get our free foot book “Happy Feet for the Rest of Your Life” , mailed directly to your home.

Seattle foot and ankle specialist, Dr. Rion Berg offers foot care for patients with bunions, heel pain, diabetes, fungal toenails, ingrown nails, and surgical solutions when needed to residents of Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland, Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Mountlake Terrace, Lynnwood and other surrounding suburbs.

Map of Seattle street end shoreline access

As the fight over the Northeast 130th Street street end beach continues with Seattle Mayor Ed Murray’s Thursday announcement that the City of Seattle plans to reacquire the formerly public beach, we thought we’d take a look at other street ends on local shorelines. This map created from City of Seattle data shows all the street ends that allow public access to Seattle shorelines. Note that some, such as the NE 130th Street access, are not currently open to the public.

Efforts are underway by Seattle Parks and Recreation to improve many of these public sites. You can click on each of the sites to find out more information.

Mayor to move forward on acquisition of N.E. 130th Street beach

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The former public beach at the end of NE 130th Street is shown after a fence was erected by the adjacent homeowners.

Lake City Live recieved the following press release from the City of Seattle Thursday afternoon. We will update with further information as it becomes available.

 

SEATTLE (August 13, 2015) Mayor Ed Murray today announced that the City plans to purchase portions of two properties that make up the former N.E. 130th Street beach from the current owners and restore waterfront access for the public. 

“For decades, generations of Seattle residents enjoyed lakefront access from the N.E. 130th Street beach,” said Mayor Murray. “I have directed the Parks Department to begin the process of restoring that access by acquiring the properties using all tools at our disposal.”  


The two properties lie at the end of N.E. 130th Street and Rivera Place, near the Burke-Gilman Trail in the Cedar Park neighborhood in the Lake City area. Earlier this year, the private property owners restricted the public from accessing the waterfront.

“This parcel bordering Lake Washington has been used by the public to gain access to the water for over 80 years. It was very unfortunate to have access denied,” said Councilmember Jean Godden. “It’s great news that the City is now taking affirmative steps to restore this property to the public and to neighbors who know how much it matters to save this beach.” 

“Privatizing public property based upon an 82 year-old records error is a disservice to the neighborhood,” said Councilmember Nick Licata. “I commend the Mayor for joining the Council in reclaiming what has long served as the only public access to Lake Washington between Matthews Beach and the northern city limits.”

“I visited the 130th Street beach with neighbors and community members and stand firmly behind them in their desire to have the beach end returned to its original use—a neighborhood park,” said Councilmember Sally Bagshaw. “Many congratulations to the community who worked hard to ensure this space is open and welcoming to the community.”

“When public access to Lake Washington was taken away, community activists pushed the City to recover it,” said Councilmember Kshama Sawant. “Generations in Lake City will be able to swim in the neighborhood due to their organizing efforts.” 

Under the Mayor’s direction, Seattle Parks and Recreation will send a purchase and sale agreement to the current owners. The owners will then have 30 days to agree with the terms, counter-offer, or decline. In the event a negotiated purchase of the portions of the properties cannot be reached, the Mayor will transmit an ordinance to City Council authorizing the use of eminent domain to acquire the parcels for public use and benefit. 

“The 130th Street beach has provided recreational access to Lake Washington for residents since 1932,” said Dave Pope of the Friends of 130th Street Beach community group. “As Seattle continues to grow, more parks are needed, not fewer. I applaud Mayor Murray and City Council for taking the first steps in restoring beach access for those who do not have the luxury of owning waterfront property.”   

“Shoreline access is precious everywhere in Seattle,” said Jesús Aguirre, Superintendent of Seattle Parks and Recreation. “We constantly strive to increase park and recreation opportunities for our residents and restoring this property to public use provides critical access for the community.”

In June, the City Council sent Mayor Murray a letter urging him to condemn the properties. The letter was signed by all members of the Council.

How Does HALA Affect Lake City? Workshop this Saturday!

HALA reportThere’s been a lot of press about the Mayor’s new Housing Affordability and Livability Agenda (HALA). Much of that press has focused on the elimination of single-family zoning. Feeling confused? The report itself is long and complicated (65 recommendations and 76 pages long). However, it’s critically important to understand as Seattle grapples with the very real problem of housing affordability and livability. Wondering how HALA will impact Lake City?

Please join your Lake City neighbors for a workshop this Saturday, Aug. 1st, co-hosted by the Lake City Neighborhood Alliance (LCNA)Lake City Future First (LCFF), and North District Council (NDC).

All are welcome!
12509 27th Ave NE (in the downstairs ADA-accessible meeting room)
8:30 am – Coffee available
9:00 am -12:00pm – Workshop

 

Goals of the Workshop?

LCNA logo with PEOPLE copyLCNA Chair, Sandy Motzer notes, “We are not attempting to seek unanimous support for any recommendation but rather to convey Lake City’s support and/or opposition and/or concerns in five areas:

  1. How-to achieve the Mayor’s stated goal of 20,000 affordable units over the next 10 years
  2. Housing (and small business) displacement
  3. Proposed single-family zoning changes
  4. Proposed development/construction requirement changes
  5. Infrastructure requirements for livability.”

 

Workshop agenda includes:
Brief introductions to the workshop and to the 5 topic areas, small-group discussions. There will be time for everyone to attend two of the 5 small-group discussions of choice. Discussion leaders will summarize each discussion topic for the large group. That content will be what is sent by LCNA to the Mayor and others on behalf of Lake City. LCNA is encouraging each neighborhood organization and all individuals to write letters as well. Workshop sponsors ask that anyone attending the workshop read the HALA Report as submitted by the Committee to the Mayor. You can find the report here.

 

Shooting and standoff on 32nd AVE NE


One man was shot in the leg, resulting in a standoff on 32nd Avenue Northeast near Northeast 145th Street. The shooting comes just days after another young man was found dead from a gunshot wound in a nearby parking lot.

About 11:20, a group of people that may be involved came out of the building with their hands up. Seattle Police said they may have been involved in an earlier dispute with the victim. Police said a total of 5 people were detained.

As SWAT officers moved in, police closed Lake City Way/Bothell Way NE and NE 145th Street.

The first medics were dispatched to the scene at 10:07am and the victim was transported in a medic unit.

From Seattle Police:

Police arrived in the 14300 block of 32nd Avenue NE around 10:15 AM after receiving reports one man had been shot. Officers found the man, who had sustained a gunshot wound to the leg. Medics transported the man to Harborview Medical Center with non-life-threatening injuries.

At the scene, officers learned a group of men and women had been in a dispute at a nearby apartment building just before the shooting. When the group emerged from the building, at least one man involved in the dispute opened fire, striking the victim.

Police are now searching for four men and a woman, who may have fled back into the building following the shooting.

SPD negotiators, SWAT, Washington State Patrol, Shoreline Police and Seattle patrol officers are all on scene working get the group to surrender to officers..

Some at the scene expressed concern about a rise of violence in the neighborhood with the death earlier in the week near Friday’s shooting scene. Some said they regularly hear gunfire in the neighborhood. Seattle Police spokesman Patrick Michaud said that if people feel unsafe they should call 911 to give police data to track crime trends in a neighborhood.

Police moved people back from the scene and said the area was not safe after Friday’s shooting. SWAT officers and an armored vehicle were used to clear people from an apartment building near the scene of the shooting. But it was unknown at the time if the suspect was still in the building.

Police said to avoid the area until they gave an all clear.

Large tree branch falls on car, closes NE 125th Street

 

A large branch fell from a tree over NE 125th Street, crashing down onto a passenger car. The driver had minor injuries according to the Seattle Police Department. 

The accident, reported at 8:24 am, had first responders arrive on scene to find a massive branch stretching across the entire road near 22nd Avenue Northeast, and resting on the fence of an adjacent home. 

The driver had minor injuries. The windshield of the car was shattered and the cars suspension was pushed low to the ground by the weight of the tree. 

Strong winds overnight likely weakened the branch.

The adjacent home escaped damage but the fence supporting some of the branch’s weight may need some repair. The property is the same spot where a car tumbled off the road and destroyed much of the fence in 2014. 

The photo above is courtesy seattlepi.com 

Lake City Passport Program Underway

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Last year’s winners surrounded by program supporters.

Want to support local businesses? Celebrate Lake City’s diversity? In it’s second year, this “World of Tastes in Lake City” program is designed to help do just that. Many of the participating businesses are family-owned by local Lake City residents.

 

To participate, grab a passport from Kaffeeklatsch.  Visit the other participating restaurants and markets any time between now and August 9th. Once you’ve completed your passport, return it to Kaffeeklatsch. Winners will be drawn at random from completed passports. First prize this year is a $250 Visa gift card!