A Parent’s Guide to Foot Health for Athletic Kids

baseballMillions of American children will participate in warm weather sports this year, from softball to soccer and swimming to cycling. No matter what their sport or whether they play competitively or just for fun, they will have one important thing in common: They’ll need their feet to be pain-free if they’re going to play their best and prevent injuries.

“Sports play a significant role in the lives of millions of young athletes,” says Rion Berg DPM, a podiatrist at the Foot and Ankle Center of Lake City and member of the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA). “Parents need to be aware that sports, which require a substantial amount of running, turning, and contact, can translate to injuries. Protecting children’s feet from injuries, and bringing them to a podiatrist when problems occur, can help keep kids in the game and make the sport more enjoyable.”

APMA offers some tips for helping protect children’s feet while playing warm-weather sports:

  • Protective taping of the ankles is often necessary to help prevent sprains or fractures.
  • Buying a shoe designed for the specific sport your child plays not only improves your child’s performance in the sport, but it also can help protect him or her from serious foot and ankle injuries. APMA has given its Seal of Acceptance to select sports footwear, which offer quality materials and protective support.
  • Without the right sock, even the best athletic shoe won’t score points—on the field or off. Athletic socks should consist of a natural/synthetic blend, which is best at wicking away moisture and minimizing foot odor. Socks should not have large seams that might cause blisters or irritation. Commonly played warm-weather sports and the risks associated with them include:
  • Basketball – Children playing basketball may be at risk for ankle sprains, tendinitis, and plantar fasciitis (inflammation of the thick band of tissue on the sole of the foot). To minimize the risk of foot injury, choose a shoe with a thick, stiff sole, high ankle support, and shock absorption.
  • Tennis – The rapid, repetitive lateral movements and shifting of weight required of tennis players can lead to injuries such as ankle sprains, plantar fasciitis, and corns or calluses. Tennis players will do best with a flexible-soled shoe that supports both sides of the foot.
  • Running – Movements required of runners include leg extension and hitting the balls of the feet with a great deal of force. Running can lead to shin splints, heel pain, and blisters. A good running shoe should offer good support and shock absorption. In some cases, custom orthotics may be necessary to provide additional support and control of foot motion.
  • Soccer – The running, jumping, and lateral movements required of soccer players can lead to many foot injuries, with heel pain and shin splints being among the most common. Soccer shoes should provide multiple cleats in the heel area and enough room for thick soccer socks.

“Sports-related foot and ankle injuries are on the rise as more children participate actively in sports,” Dr. Berg says. “Parents need to be vigilant to ensure children’s feet remain healthy and safe. And remember—lack of complaint by a child is not a reliable sign that everything is fine. The bones of growing feet are so flexible that they can be twisted and distorted without the child being aware of it.”

Ensuring your child’s feet stay healthy could go a long way—your young athlete could one day be the next LeBron James or Brandi Chastain. If your child participates in strenuous sports, monitor his or her foot health closely. If you suspect a problem, take your child to a podiatrist for evaluation and treatment.

Rion Berg DPM is a podiatrist at Foot and Ankle Center of Lake in Seattle, WA.  Call 206-368-7000 or visit www.bergdpm.com to make an appointment. Visit www.apma.org to learn more about foot health and care.

 

Lake City Community Center April Events

April 8 9:30 AM  Chamber 101  
Chamber orientation for prospective, new and current Members of the North Seattle Chamber of Commerce (NSCC)

April 9  12PM-1PM  NSCC Lunch & Learn
New, monthly speakers event scheduled for the 2nd Thursday of the month. Our April Featured Speaker is Darryll Russell, The Russell Group, on a new Chamber benefit: 5 hours of free coaching!

April 11 9AM-3PM  Lake City Flea Market
Old, new, recycled goods. It’s a great haunt on a Saturday!

April 19 8AM-2PM Toy Show
It’s a buy-sell-trade show! Free admission.

April 25 9AM-5PM  A Very Vintage Market
A shabby chic flea market. If you haven’t been, stop by. Admission is free.

April 26 10AM-4PM Yo Mama’s Records
Recorded music since the start of time. Teach your kids about vinyl, 8 tracks, etc. and see other music memorabilia. Free admission.

 

 

Hellbent Brewing opening soon in Lake City

Hellbent Brewing's new tanks are shown. (LCL photo)

Hellbent Brewing’s new tanks are shown. (LCL photo)

Lake City is starting to become a beer destination. Elliott Bay Brewing Co. and The Beer Authority already attract a healthy crowd from across north Seattle to their successful establishments. Add to that list Lake City’s soon to open Hellbent Brewing Company.

Hellbent Brewing's future location is shown on Lake City Way. (LCL photo)

Hellbent Brewing’s future location is shown on Lake City Way. (LCL photo)

The future brewery has been under construction since October of 2014, but just now, as an illuminated sign has been installed and brewing equipment can be seen inside, has the project become obvious along Lake City Way.

The tasting room. (LCL photo)

The tasting room under construction. (LCL photo)

The brewery is a project by partners Brian Young, Jack Guinn, Chris Giles and Randy Embernate. The roughly 7,500 square-foot space across Lake City Way from Fred Meyer will feature a tasting room, an upper level lounge with games including pinball, pool tables and televisions.

The interior is accented with aged and reclaimed wood, steel and wrought iron. The tasting room features a pair of gorgeous, milled madrone trees as the bartop.

One of the business partners owns the building, which previously was a manufacturing business and decades ago was said to be a Chinese restaurant.

Hellbent will have a tavern license and will feature rotating food trucks in their back lot. They also eventually hope to have a patio area for use during warm months. A cold storage facility will take up part of the rear of the property.

The upstairs lounge is shown under construction. (LCL photo)

The upstairs lounge is shown under construction. (LCL photo)

Hellbent is in the final stages of construction and the business’s owners hope to be open in about one month.

You can take a virtual tour of the Hellbent Brewing in the video below.

Below the Hellbent team made a fun video showing some of the construction.

March at LakeCity Community Center

flea market

March 14, 9AM-3PM  Lake City Lions Flea Market
Always a fun hunt! Old, new…COOL! Admission is free.

March 21-22 Rock & Gem Show raw gem
A Lake City Community Center tradition! This event is fun for kids of all ages. Come on down for great day!

 

March 28 9AM-5PM A Very Vintage Market
Shabby Chic at it’s finest. Very Vintage is a beautiful market of renewed and revitalized items from our past. Don’t miss it!

DancingFish2015 (1)SalmonFest Seattle Scheduled One Week Later This Year
This years event will be held on the 2nd weekend in August, kicking off with the Salmon Bake on Friday, August 7 (it runs all weekend) joined by the Community Street Festival Saturday and Sunday August 8-9. Vendors, Kid’s Activities, Beer Garden, LIve Music, and Car Show!

New this year is the Emerging Artisans Market. Emerging Artisans are those who are taking their hobby and turning it into a business, or have been selling their own, handmade items for less than a year. Please contact us for details, northseattlechamber@gmail.com.

Vendor Applications are being accepted now for SalmonFest Seattle 2015!  Sign up online at www.salmonfestseattle.com.

‘Private property’ signs go up at formerly public beach on Lake Washington

"Private property" signs recently went up at a beach that for nearly 80 years was public.

“Private property” signs recently went up at a beach that for nearly 80 years was public.

“Private property” signs were recently staked into the ground of a piece of waterfront property that for nearly 80 years was used as public access to the water of Lake Washington. Marks on the ground show where a sign that was announcing improvements planned by the City of Seattle was dragged away.

Lake City Live has been following the controversy and the court’s ruling that gave ownership of the property at the end NE 130th Street to the adjacent property owners. You can see our coverage here and here.

Neighbors advocating to keep the land public have been organizing via a Facebook group. They are asking the City of Seattle to condemn the property so it can be returned to public use. And in a Wednesday report, KIRO/7 said that the effort seems to be gaining traction with City of Seattle leaders.

KIRO/7 visited the site on Wednesday and filed this report. In the video below they try to talk to one of the property owners without success.

Mayor Ed Murray, Seattle DOT, Seattle PD launch traffic safety initiative at Lake City Library

Mayor Ed Murray in front of the Lake City Library

Mayor Ed Murray in front of the Lake City Library

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray, Seattle City Council members and officials from the Seattle Police Department and Department of Transportation announced “Vision Zero Seattle” during an event outside of the Lake City Library on Thursday afternoon.

Vision Zero Seattle is a program with the aim of ending traffic deaths and injuries in Seattle.

From the Mayor’s office:

While Seattle is consistently recognized as one of the safest cities in the country, more than 10,000 traffic collisions occur each year. In 2014, 3,449 injury collisions were reported to the Seattle Police Department. Fifteen people died in traffic crashes, including five who were walking or riding a bike.

At the core of Vision Zero is the belief that death and injury on city streets is preventable. The Vision Zero approach emphasizes smarter street designs – forgiving streets that account for human error. When paired with targeted education and enforcement, the effort will save lives.

The effort will include:

Pedestrians run across State Route 522, aka Lake City Way. (LCL photo)

Pedestrians run across State Route 522, aka Lake City Way. (LCL photo)

  • Reduce the speed limit in the downtown core to 25 mph by the end of 2015.
  • Improve safety at 10 high-crash intersections downtown by eliminating turns on red lights, installing leading pedestrian intervals to give walkers a head start, eliminating dual turn lanes and other engineering improvements.
  • Install 20 mph zones on residential streets in up to ten areas near parks and schools with documented collision histories.
  • Enhance safety on arterials — like Rainier Avenue S, 35th Avenue SW, Fauntleroy Way SW and 5th Avenue NE where 90 percent of serious and fatal collisions occur — by installing speed reductions, radar speed signs and enhanced street designs.
  • Add twelve new school zone safety cameras in six school zones to improve safety for kids as they make their way to and from school.
  • Add seven miles of protected bike lanes, more than 40 crossing improvements and 14 blocks of new sidewalk to make travel safer across all modes.
  • Conduct targeted enforcement throughout the city for school, pedestrian and bike safety, along with enhanced DUI enforcement.
  • SDOT and SPD will work together to educate people in advance of these patrols, so everyone will expect enforcement and better understand the rules of the road.

The Seattle Bike Blog reports that this is the second time City of Seattle leaders have gathered press for an announcement to end traffic injuries and deaths. The previous plan announced, the Road Safety Action Plan, had a similar goal. From the Seattle Bike Blog:

Since that plan, the city has launched a brilliant and successful school zone speed camera program, which slows down traffic and helps to fund safety projects like Safe Routes to School. The city also crafted a new Bicycle Master Plan.

But more must be done. Will the new Vision Zero plan be bolder? Will there be serious funding? Stay tuned for details.